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Name: A W Chen
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Question:
For my science fair project I would like to know if every part of the brain is used all the time and what parts of the brain are used a lot at school?



Replies:
I'm not sure at what level you are asking "part of the brain". If you are referring to the basic structures; i.e., the cerebrum, cerebellum, medulla, the answer is simple. Yes, you are continually using all three in school. The cerebrum is your "thinking" portion and can actually be the structure that can be said to be "YOU". Your interpretation of the environment and your planned responses come from here. The cerebellum is used mostly for coordination and balance. Here is where you store the information to write letters in your handwriting and walk down the school hallways without having to think about every little detail of accomplishing these tasks. The medulla is your automatic operator for those functions of your body that you do not have to think about. It also is the gateway for much of the body information traveling to the other portions of the brain.

Steven D Sample



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