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Name: Janet
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Question:
I have just begun to raise chickens both standard eggers and Banties for pleasure. I live in western OR and some kind of bird of prey grabbed one of my bantie babies (about 1 month old) and made away with it traveling along the ground stopping a short distance away when I ran toward it, it left our bantie baby hopefully unharmed. I gathered up the bantie cradleing it back to our shed. Is it unusual to have a bird of prey scoop up a domestic mammal while it is within one yard of a homo sapien? I'm as shocked as our bantie is traumatized! Please advise, Thanks.



Replies:
HI,

Birds of Prey [raptors] know their limitations and if modivated by hunger, will without question behave similarly to what you have described. Many birds have become accustom to humans. I'm surprised that the bird did not take off with its catch. You may have a neigbor who actively feeds these birds and that may explain its behavior.

Steve Sample
NEWTON BBS Co-sysop
Ask A Scientist Manager
Division of Educational Programs
Argonne National laboratory


It might be a bit unusual for the raptor (bird of prey) to come so close to a person, otherwise it is certainly quite normal behavior for them, they will hunt what they can, and domestic birds are notoriously easy prey.

John Elliott



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