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Name: Joe
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Question:
If you were to clone a human, would the fingerprints of the clone and original human be the same?



Replies:
Joe,

The prints should be the same to the extent they are the result of genetic development. If the source of the clone, however, cut or burned or otherwise damaged its 'fingerprint area', the result would not be seen on the clone. In general, any 'experience' (non-genetic) influences on traits will not be seen in the offspring unless they are changes which directly influenced/altered the source cloning cells genetic material.

Good question!
Thanks for using NEWTON!

Richard R. Rupnik


Actually, this experiment has been done. Identical twins are a type of clone. It turns out that their fingerprints are similar, but not identical.

Richard Barrans Jr., Ph.D.


Nature provides us with the natural form of clones: identical twins share the same genetic makeup and even developed in the same uterus. Nevertheless, their fingerprints are not identical, though similar. The formation of fingerprints is partly the result of a stochastic process. Dr. Trudy Wassenaar


Identical twins don't have the same fingerprints because although fingerprints are determined genetically, they are modified in the womb by differences in pressure on the fingertips, etc. during development. So as long as a clone was incubated in a womb or other aqueous environment I would have to say that their fingerprints would be subject to the same modifications. So, I would guess no.

Van Hoeck



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