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Name: Lance
Status: Student
Age: 15
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: N/A 


Question:
I have read on the Internet that the energy present around a cell's membrane is 300 milliwatts. Since the human body contains over 100 trillion cells, that must mean that we contain a huge amount of power. Do you think this is true?



Replies:
Perhaps you can give us a URL to check this out ourselves. 300 milliwatts sounds like a tremendous amount of power for a little cell to be churning out. If that number is true, we should all be fireballs, kicking out 30 gigawatts each. This obviously is NOT the case.

Perhaps the reference was to an electric potential, in millivolts?

Richard E. Barrans Jr., Ph.D.
Assistant Director
PG Research Foundation, Darien, Illinois


It depends on how you look at it...every atom has nuclear binding forces with energy associated...every molecule has bond energy between its atoms...there are gazillions ( a very big number ) of molecules in a human body. Someone I know sometime ago estimated the bond energy (potential energy) and found it to be near a large atomic bombs energy...one thing...to usefully harness that energy is another thing altogether.

pf



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