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Name: Chris
Status: Other
Grade:  Other
Location: HI
Country: United States
Date: July 2008


Question:
I know that we have the ability to copy DNA, but is there a way to group DNA into characteristics using a computer and and then attach them to other base pairs and create the perfect genome?



Replies:
And what would the perfect genome look like? Even if we could do that, remember that organisms genomes have been shaped by evolution and natural selection. The perfect genome for one organism even of the same species depends on the environment it finds itself in.

Kvh


No. There are over 6 billion base pairs worth of DNA in the human genome comprising about 50,000 essential genes. If you could arrange 1 base every second, it would take 190 years.

Ron Baker, Ph.D.


DNA can be manipulated in several ways, but techniques remain highly complicated, expensive, and time consuming. There are still many complex mysteries being resolved in terms of all the roles DNA can play as well. Building a custom-designed genome from the bottom up is still a goal for the future.

I also think there is no such thing as a "perfect" genome any more than there is a "perfect" car. Different traits are useful for different situations, and one set that's perfect for one situation may not be so perfect for another situation.

Hope this helps,
Burr



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