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Name: Mark
Status: other
Grade: other
Location: AR
Country: N/A
Date: 1/29/2006


Question:
A few years ago there was a news report on national tv relating to a device called a tumble generator. It was said to produce enough power to provide power for 3 or 4 city blocks. It used magnets set in a self powering unit. I have multiple interne searches, but with no success. Do you have any info on this unit?


Replies:
Sorry, I never heard that at all...

Sounds a little like "peaker" generators, though. How about "turbine" or "turbo" generator? An earth-mounted jet engine with magnets on it's turbine blades and wire-coils nearby can generate about that much electric power, in cabinet (very roughly) 6x12 feet. I read it was relatively noisy for neighbors, and less efficient than the full-sized oil-burning power-plant burning similar fuel. They were in the news a few years ago, related to shortages in electric generation capacity. Being relatively small, they could be started & stopped much quicker & cheaper than a full-sized generator. Helpful, but not ready to replace the status quo, unfortunately.

Jim Swenson



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