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Question:
Scientists at Fermilab in Batavia have told the world they have that the "top quark," the missing component of matter, exists. What does this actually mean to us? Does it mean it is going to lead to a condition of unlimited available energy? What are the uses to m mankind for these quarks?



Replies:
Here are two answers to your question about uses for the top quark:
1. Someone much smarter than me once answered a similar question by saying that the answer must be very much like the answer to "What good is a new born baby?"
2. Finding the top quark has been one of the toughest problems facing people who do science. The people who seem to be solving that problem are therefore showing that they are among the smartest people in the world. So maybe the payoff is that these are the people that we should be recruiting to help solve the tough practical problems that face the world.

Jack L. Uretsky


Getting the tongue out of the cheak... along the lines off Jack L. Uretskyniversity's response, there is currently no practical use for the top quark. Quarks them in themselves are quite useful , considering that everything in the universe is made of them. However, finding quarks as of , as of right now provides us no practical ratical advances. But who knows what they will bring 25, 50, 100 years from now? The reason for all the excitement, and the tough problem Jack L. Uretsky refers to, is that the discovery of the f the top quark supports the validity of a theory known as the standard model. The standard model is part of a they attempt to describe everything in the whole universe by a single physical model.

timo p grayson



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