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Question:
Are there more quarks since January, 1995? Are scientists still seeking more quarks? ---Mary



Replies:
Well, the number of quarks does not change, just our knowledge about what that number really is. That is, the number of different TYPES of quarks does not change - of course individual quarks can come and go. But yes, it was recently announced that experiments have confirmed the existence of the top quark, which has been expected and looked for probably almost 20 years now. Most theorists think that is it, but there could possibly be even heavier ones we have no knowledge of as yet. The total number of different types of quarks is then 6. Actually, counting antiquarks and quarks of the (3) allowed colors, the real total number of different kinds of quarks is 36. And yes, people always continue to look for new things, so the possibility of more quarks is definitely being investigated as far as is possible.

Arthur Smith


Yes research continues in the area of high energy physics/ particle physics not to long ago at Fermilab a run showed more data experimentally with respect to Z-top or the top quark,.... more work needs to be done here , since the mass of the particle was uniquely high, further work continues here of course as well as work related to the quest for the Higgs Boson. But there is continued work on all particles and areas of particle physics, the greater understanding we have in this area brings us to a better understanding of our world.

Harry



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