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Name: timmey
Status: student
Age: 10
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: 5/18/2004


Question:
we have a robin building a nest in a low tree next to my front door at home. I can watch this process and it is fasinating. My questions is after the robin lays the eggs will she get protective? will she fly around chasing us if we are near the tree and not bothering her at all? will this happen after the eggs hatch? Is there a way to discourage the robin from building the nest in this tree?


Replies:
Yes, she will be protective or might abandon the nest early )-: birds are typicalky very territorial so there is a good chance she will be back.

PF


Yes, both male and female adult robins will tend the young after the eggs hatch, and will be protective. Birds are individuals and don't all act the same, but it is common for adult robins to be a little aggressive, but not usually as much as red-wing blackbirds, for example. I can't say how close you will have to be before the adults chase you, probably within ten or fifteen feet or so. Some robins are pretty calm and might not chase a person at all. If you really need to discourge them from building in that tree, it will probably be hard. Frightenng them with loud noises, garden hoses or the like might work, but it really isn't a very good idea unless there's a very important reason for them to not build there. Enjoy watching them, its a great treat.

J. Elliott


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