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Question:
Do birds of prey communicate with each other or other raptors?


Replies:
Birds of prey communicate with each other for mating, territory calls, and to indicate predators. The young will make noise to call their parents to the nest with food.

Grace Fields


All birds, and pretty much all animals, communicate in one way or another. Raptors and other birds have a wide range of vocal calls for courtship, alarm, contact around nests, and more. Visual displays may be used for similar reasons. The Audubon Society Encyclopedia of North American Birds, (Terres, ed.) and The Bird Watcher's Companion (Leahy, ed.) are good starting references for all subjects in basic bird life and behavior. A useful newer book is Sibley Guide to Bird Life & Behavior.

J. Elliott


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